Discover the African Diaspora through Dash's eyes

21st October 2014

Photo reblogged from ANGRY WOMEN OF COLOR UNITED with 2,452 notes

rickywastingtime:

vivabandida:

Be fearless and stay on your grind. Be legendary! (at ✨👑👑✨)

Diosas Latinas. 

rickywastingtime:

vivabandida:

Be fearless and stay on your grind. Be legendary! (at ✨👑👑✨)

Diosas Latinas. 

Source: vivabandida

21st October 2014

Link reblogged from AfroLatin@ Forum with 17 notes

Tackling Race and Racism in the Latino Community - COLORLINES →

afrolatinoforum:

Valle, a doctoral student at Colombia University, highlights the upcoming afrolatin@ forum taking place in New York next week, where panels will tackle everything from media to immigration and more. The program also includes a book presentation of Pigmentocracies: Ethnicity, Race, and Color in Latin America, described as “a richly revealing analysis of contemporary attitudes toward ethnicity and race in Brazil, Colombia, Mexico, and Peru, four of Latin America’s most populous nations.” The presentation takes place the evening of Tuesday, October 21. 

In her essay, Valle wonders about what disproportionate discrimination also means for black Latinos here in the states:

In the United States, less than 3% of all Latin@s identify as racially Black. What does this mean for access to resources determined by numerical representations for millions of Latinos and Latinas of African descent?

21st October 2014

Link with 20 notes

TV Series Based on Queen of Salsa's Celia Cruz is Underway; Puertorican Actors Jeimy Osorio & Modesto Lacen Star →

*jigs*

Tagged: celia cruz

21st October 2014

Photo reblogged from Empowered AfroLatina with 75 notes

afrolatinoforum:

Thursday, October 23rd, 6:00pm - 9:00pm Schomburg Center for Research in Black CulturePlenary Conference Opening: Race Counts!WelcomeMiriam Jiménez Roman, Executive Director, afrolatin@ forum
Darren Walker, President, Ford Foundation 
Juan Flores, co-founder, afrolatin@ forum
Round-table DiscussionPedro Noguera, New York University
Tanya K. Hernández, Fordham University School of Law
Leonardo Reales Jiménez, Human Rights Activist, Storyteller, and University Professor
Tianna Paschel, Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of Chicago
Rolando Roebuck, Community Activist, Washington, DC
Cultural PresentationRSVP for Thursday Night’s Plenary




Friday, October 24th, 8:30am - 6:00pmGraduate Center, City University of New York9:00am - 9:15amArrival and registration
9:15am - 10:45amIn and Out of Focus: Media and AfroLatin@ Representation
AfroLatin@s in the Classroom: Youth, Education and Culture
11:00am - 12:30pm    Looking Suspicious: The Racialization of Crime
Taking Measures: AfroLatin@s and Economic Inequities
12:30pm - 1:30pm
Lunch
1:30pm - 3:00pm¿Y nosotros qué?: Acknowledging the AfroLatin@ Immigrant 
AfroLatin@s and Health Disparities: When Both Race and Ethnicity Matter
3:00pm - 3:30pmBreak
3:30pm - 5:00pmPlenary: Connecting Stories: The Practice of Racial Dialogues
5:15pm -  6:45pmClosing Plenary: Identity, Visibility and Representation: The Role of the Census





Saturday, October 25th, 1:00pm - 6:00pm El Museo del Barrio1:00pm - 2:30pm    Panel: Recounting the Afrolatin@ Artist Experience – Past, Present, & Future
2:30pm - 3:30pm    Dance and Mask-Making Workshops
3:30pm - 5:00pm         Musical and Cultural Performances
4:30pm - 5:30pmReception
RSVP for Saturday’s Family Day
View schedule HERE

Will be there!

afrolatinoforum:

Thursday, October 23rd, 6:00pm - 9:00pm 
Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

Plenary Conference Opening: Race Counts!

Welcome
  • Miriam Jiménez Roman, Executive Director, afrolatin@ forum
  • Darren Walker, President, Ford Foundation 
  • Juan Flores, co-founder, afrolatin@ forum

Round-table Discussion
  • Pedro Noguera, New York University
  • Tanya K. Hernández, Fordham University School of Law
  • Leonardo Reales Jiménez, Human Rights Activist, Storyteller, and University Professor
  • Tianna Paschel, Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of Chicago
  • Rolando Roebuck, Community Activist, Washington, DC

Cultural Presentation

RSVP for Thursday Night’s Plenary


Saturday, October 25th, 1:00pm - 6:00pm 
El Museo del Barrio


1:00pm - 2:30pm    

2:30pm - 3:30pm    

3:30pm - 5:00pm         

4:30pm - 5:30pm
  • Reception

RSVP for Saturday’s Family Day
View schedule HERE

Will be there!

Source: afrolatinoforum

21st October 2014

Photo reblogged from Diaspora Dash with 135 notes

negrodocumentary:

NEGRO: A documentary about Latino Identity Screening + Panel Discussion on AfroLatinas and beauty image and mental health with the producer Dash Harris, Carolina Contreras of Miss Rizos.com
Sunday, October 26th 
2pm-4pm 
La Casa Azul Bookstore
103rd St. and Lexington

$10 suggested donation
RSVP to RSVP.lacasaazul@gmail.com 

Please consider bringing a brown doll for the newly launched AfroLatino Travel’s “Brown Dolls for Brown Children - Panama” Campaign. 




Sorry about that!!! The correct e-mail to RSVP is: RSVP.lacasaazul@gmail.com

negrodocumentary:

NEGRO: A documentary about Latino Identity Screening + Panel Discussion on AfroLatinas and beauty image and mental health with the producer Dash Harris, Carolina Contreras of Miss Rizos.com

Sunday, October 26th
2pm-4pm 
La Casa Azul Bookstore
103rd St. and Lexington
$10 suggested donation
RSVP to RSVP.lacasaazul@gmail.com 
Please consider bringing a brown doll for the newly launched AfroLatino Travel’s “Brown Dolls for Brown Children - Panama” Campaign. 

Sorry about that!!! The correct e-mail to RSVP is: RSVP.lacasaazul@gmail.com

Source: negrodocumentary

21st October 2014

Link with 27 notes

Let’s Talk About Race (in Latin@ Communities) →

In Latin America, African descendants are well over a third of the total population, yet significantly fewer self-identify in most nations. In the United States, less than 3% of all Latin@s identify as racially Black. What does this mean for access to resources determined by numerical representations for millions of Latinos and Latinas of African descent? 

Tagged: afrolatinosafrolatinaslatinalatinoafrican diaspora

20th October 2014

Quote reblogged from Esoterica with 2,085 notes

In various schools in Uganda, and some other parts of Africa, children as young as five are punished for speaking African languages, indigenous languages and mother tongues at school. The modes of punishment differ. The most common one in Uganda is wearing a dirty sack until you meet someone else speaking their mother tongue and then you pass the sack on to them. In some schools, there are specific pupils and students tasked with compiling lists of fellow pupils and students speaking mother tongues. This list is then handed over to a teacher responsible for punishing these language rule-breakers. According to Gilbert Kaburu, some schools have aprons that read: “Shame on me, I was speaking vernacular” handed over to an offender of the No Vernacular rule, who then is tasked with finding the next culprit to give the apron. Most of the punishments, in their symbolism emphasise the uselessness of the African languages.

Commenting on a photo of two children in Uganda wearing dirty sacks as punishment for speaking their mother tongues, Zimbabwean writer, Tendai Huchu says:

“That sums up our self loathing and inferiority complex. Junot Diaz once said we do a better job of enforcing white supremacy ourselves than white supremacists ever could. I should add, notice how the punishment consists of wearing sack-cloth. The image is telling. You are rags if you speak your own language.”

Halima Hosh, agreeing with Tendai Huchu opines:

“It’s outrageous. What a slave mentality that a colonial language is considered higher or better/more worth than their own local language. Unbelievable. Do the Europeans learn any African language in school? No. Why not? Because we are not proud of our heritage, not proud of our languages, not proud of Black African history. These teachers need to be fired.

This is a serious problem. Read the entire article here: http://thisisafrica.me/schools-punishing-children-speaking-african-languages/ (via linglife)

Languages don’t generally become endangered because people just don’t really feel like speaking them anymore: it’s often much more brutal. And similar methods for repressing indigenous languages happen all over the world: this reminded me of a memorable quote from a man in Alaska “Whenever I speak Tlingit, I can still taste the soap.” 

(via allthingslinguistic)

They make the kids seek out ‘bad kids’ so they can pass on their ‘failure’. This is how white supremacy becomes internalized.

(via diloolie)

Source: linglife

18th October 2014

Photo reblogged from Negro with 135 notes

negrodocumentary:

NEGRO: A documentary about Latino Identity Screening + Panel Discussion on AfroLatinas and beauty image and mental health with the producer Dash Harris, Carolina Contreras of Miss Rizos.com
Sunday, October 26th 
2pm-4pm 
La Casa Azul Bookstore
103rd St. and Lexington

$10 suggested donation
RSVP to lacasaazulbookstore@gmail.com 

Please consider bringing a brown doll for the newly launched AfroLatino Travel’s “Brown Dolls for Brown Children - Panama” Campaign. 

negrodocumentary:

NEGRO: A documentary about Latino Identity Screening + Panel Discussion on AfroLatinas and beauty image and mental health with the producer Dash Harris, Carolina Contreras of Miss Rizos.com

Sunday, October 26th
2pm-4pm 
La Casa Azul Bookstore
103rd St. and Lexington
$10 suggested donation
RSVP to lacasaazulbookstore@gmail.com 
Please consider bringing a brown doll for the newly launched AfroLatino Travel’s “Brown Dolls for Brown Children - Panama” Campaign. 

14th October 2014

Photoset reblogged from #ADPhD with 1,917 notes

soulbrotherv2:

N.O. lawyer transforms Whitney Plantation into powerful slavery museum

BY MIMI READ

WALLACE — At Whitney Plantation, one of the antebellum estates that line the Great River Road between New Orleans and Baton Rouge, the architectural centerpiece is a Creole-style main house where hand-painted ceilings are adorned with flowers and vines. Out front are a matching pair of pigeonniers and an alley of oak trees whose branches theatrically drag the ground.

It’s easy to imagine a typical moonlight-and-magnolias tour unfolding here, with guides in hoop skirts expounding on the antiques — except that Whitney’s owner, John Cummings, will have none of that.

“Who in the hell built this house?” Cummings thundered recently while ferrying a couple of visitors around Whitney’s 250 acres in a golf cart through the rain. “Who built this son of a bitch? We have to own our history.”

[Continue reading article at The New Orleans Advocate.]

Source: soulbrotherv2

14th October 2014

Post with 3 notes

Mi ah whine an touch

Song been stuck in my head bc they play it every second and simply EVERYWHERE here. 

Tagged: panama