Discover the African Diaspora through Dash's eyes

19th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Negro with 265 notes

afrolatinoforum:

Red de Mujeres Afro-latinoamericanas, Afrocaribeñas y de la Diáspora, Encuentro Diaspora Afro, Where and When I Enter, the Caribbean Cultural Center & African Diaspora Institute and the Afrolatin@ Projectinvite you to attend a panel discussion
MONDAY SEPTEMBER 22, 20146-8:30 PM
"THE STATE OF BLACK WOMEN IN LATIN AMERICA"
Altagracia Balcácer Molina (Dominican Republic)Paola Yañez Inofuentes (Bolivia) Nedelka Lacayo (Honduras)Yvette Modestin, Moderator (Panama) 
Opening Remarks: Dr. Marta Moreno Vega, Caribbean Cultural Center & African Diaspora Institute
FREE
WILLIAMSBURG MUSIC CENTER  367 BEDFORD AVE. @ SOUTH 6thWILLIAMSBURG, BROOKLYN
J-M-Z Train to Marcy Ave. 
Reception: Live Performance by Mai-elka Prado of the Del Sonido Collective; Poetry reading by Monica Carrillo to follow.
Come hear activists from the Network of Afro-latinamerican, Afro-Caribbean and Diaspora women as they share their experiences and discuss their work to raise the visibility and improve the lives of women in their communities. It has been well documented that when women are empowered, communities prosper. They will also provide an interim report on their progress as collaborators in the MY World / World We Want 2015 campaign. With the launch of the International Decade of People of African Descent and the Sustainable Development Goals both in 2015 this will be a timely discussion.

This needs to be packed.

afrolatinoforum:

Red de Mujeres Afro-latinoamericanas, Afrocaribeñas y de la DiásporaEncuentro Diaspora AfroWhere and When I Enter, the Caribbean Cultural Center & African Diaspora Institute and the Afrolatin@ Projectinvite you to attend a panel discussion

MONDAY SEPTEMBER 22, 2014
6-8:30 PM

"THE STATE OF BLACK WOMEN IN LATIN AMERICA"

Altagracia Balcácer Molina (Dominican Republic)
Paola Yañez Inofuentes (Bolivia) 
Nedelka Lacayo (Honduras)
Yvette Modestin, Moderator (Panama) 

Opening Remarks: Dr. Marta Moreno Vega, Caribbean Cultural Center & African Diaspora Institute

FREE

WILLIAMSBURG MUSIC CENTER
  367 BEDFORD AVE. @ SOUTH 6th
WILLIAMSBURG, BROOKLYN

J-M-Z Train to Marcy Ave. 

Reception: Live Performance by Mai-elka Prado of the Del Sonido Collective; Poetry reading by Monica Carrillo to follow.

Come hear activists from the Network of Afro-latinamerican, Afro-Caribbean and Diaspora women as they share their experiences and discuss their work to raise the visibility and improve the lives of women in their communities. It has been well documented that when women are empowered, communities prosper. They will also provide an interim report on their progress as collaborators in the MY World / World We Want 2015 campaign. With the launch of the International Decade of People of African Descent and the Sustainable Development Goals both in 2015 this will be a timely discussion.

This needs to be packed.

Source: afrolatinoforum

19th September 2014

Photo reblogged from AfroLatin@ Forum with 9 notes

afrolatinoforum:

"Growing Up Locked Down" (GULD) is a 3-Day multi-media, multi-cultural, solutions-based Juvenile Justice Conference presented by The Gathering for Justice and Justice League NYC.  The Conference will include plenaries with Keynote Speakers Harry Belafonte, Bryan Stevenson, Cornel West and Bart Lubow, Panels and Workshops led by noted Juvenile Justice advocates and activists including Soffiyah Elijah, Khary Lazarre-White, Tamika Mallory, George Gresham, members of Central Park 5 and Jena 6, Clinton Lacy, Glenn E. Martin, Jeannette Bocanegra, Thenjiwe McHarris, Tynesha McHarris, Rukia Lumumba, Vince Warren, Gabrielle Horowitz-Prisco, Linda Sarsour, Cherrell Brown, Nate Balis, Scott Budnick, Nane Alejandrez and Sarah Bryer, and special events including an Opening Night Networking Social, Film Screening and a Closing Night Concert.  Participating Artists include Talib Kweli, Immortal Technique, Grace Weber, Quadir Lateef, Jasiri X, Aja Monet, Aurora Barnes, Mysonne, Impact Repertory Theatre, Mike de la Rocha and more. The Conference will also include youth-led programming, nonviolence trainings, a theater program in collaboration with The New School for Drama and Naked Angels Theater Company, and a live art event with noted conscious muralists Beats, Rhymes and Relief. The majority of GULD will take place at The New School’s brand new Tishman Auditorium on 5th Avenue. GULD is made possible by the generous sponsorship of The New School for Drama.

afrolatinoforum:

"Growing Up Locked Down" (GULD) is a 3-Day multi-media, multi-cultural, solutions-based Juvenile Justice Conference presented by The Gathering for Justice and Justice League NYC.  The Conference will include plenaries with Keynote Speakers Harry Belafonte, Bryan Stevenson, Cornel West and Bart Lubow, Panels and Workshops led by noted Juvenile Justice advocates and activists including Soffiyah Elijah, Khary Lazarre-White, Tamika Mallory, George Gresham, members of Central Park 5 and Jena 6, Clinton Lacy, Glenn E. Martin, Jeannette Bocanegra, Thenjiwe McHarris, Tynesha McHarris, Rukia Lumumba, Vince Warren, Gabrielle Horowitz-Prisco, Linda Sarsour, Cherrell Brown, Nate Balis, Scott Budnick, Nane Alejandrez and Sarah Bryer, and special events including an Opening Night Networking Social, Film Screening and a Closing Night Concert.  Participating Artists include Talib Kweli, Immortal Technique, Grace Weber, Quadir Lateef, Jasiri X, Aja Monet, Aurora Barnes, Mysonne, Impact Repertory Theatre, Mike de la Rocha and more. The Conference will also include youth-led programming, nonviolence trainings, a theater program in collaboration with The New School for Drama and Naked Angels Theater Company, and a live art event with noted conscious muralists Beats, Rhymes and Relief. The majority of GULD will take place at The New School’s brand new Tishman Auditorium on 5th Avenue. GULD is made possible by the generous sponsorship of The New School for Drama.

15th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from AfroLatin@ Forum with 2 notes

afrolatinoforum:

The AfroLatin@ Forum Presents

Making Race Count In the Census

Are Hispanics becoming white? Are Latin@s a race? How can we account for race and ethnicity in ways that best represent our interests? Can a Census form really capture our social realities?

Wednesday, September 17, 2014 6:30pm – 9:00pm

NYU – King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center 53 Washington Square South
New York, NY 10012 

15th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Chocolatey Wonder with 227,730 notes

Source: -teesa-

15th September 2014

Link with 6 notes

The black Victorians: astonishing portraits unseen for 120 years →

15th September 2014

Link with 5 notes

Meet The Latinos Who Are Preserving Our Heritage - NBC News →

15th September 2014

Link with 2 notes

Nou Bouke [We're Tired]: Haiti's Past, Present And Future →

Tagged: haiticaribbean

15th September 2014

Post reblogged from I am NOT white friendly with 15,888 notes

inspirationcocoa:

You know what I hear in my head whenever people talk about Blue Ivy’s hair: “Beyoncé has all the money to make Blue look more white but she just let’s her walk around looking so black. Cause that’s essentially what your hatin’ asses are saying.

Source: inspirationcocoa

15th September 2014

Photo reblogged from SCHOMBURG CENTER FOR RESEARCH IN BLACK CULTURE with 448 notes

schomburgcenter:

Claude McKay, Jamaican-American writer and poet, was born on this day, September 15, 1889. Jamaican born McKay moved to Harlem, after studying the Tuskegee Institute and Kansas State College, when he published some of his first collections of poetry and became a prominent literary artist in the midst of the Harlem Renaissance. Amongst the four novels he authored, “Banjo” was a best seller and won the Harmon Gold Award for Literature. “Harlem Shadows,” a collection of poetry written in 1922, was one of the first books published during the Harlem Renaissance. McKay wrote about social and political issues from the black point of view in the United States. He also wrote about love, life in Jamaica and a wide range of subjects he felt were relevant to the time. 
Image: NYPL Digital Collections 

schomburgcenter:

Claude McKay, Jamaican-American writer and poet, was born on this day, September 15, 1889. Jamaican born McKay moved to Harlem, after studying the Tuskegee Institute and Kansas State College, when he published some of his first collections of poetry and became a prominent literary artist in the midst of the Harlem Renaissance. Amongst the four novels he authored, “Banjo” was a best seller and won the Harmon Gold Award for Literature. “Harlem Shadows,” a collection of poetry written in 1922, was one of the first books published during the Harlem Renaissance. McKay wrote about social and political issues from the black point of view in the United States. He also wrote about love, life in Jamaica and a wide range of subjects he felt were relevant to the time. 

Image: NYPL Digital Collections 

15th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Empowered AfroLatina with 57 notes

negrodocumentary:

TONIGHT!
La Casa Cultural Latina Presents
NEGRO: A docu-series about Latino Identity
University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign 

negrodocumentary:

TONIGHT!

La Casa Cultural Latina Presents

NEGRO: A docu-series about Latino Identity

University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign 

Source: negrodocumentary