Discover the African Diaspora through Dash's eyes

29th August 2014

Video reblogged from La Negra Barbuda with 86,480 notes

la-negra-barbuda:

2butchboiblues2:

uglyfoxybaby:

jonsnowflakes:

Collegehumors’ new video is on point as always

DYING !!

This is good, my one prob with it

"Diet Racism, for those who aren’t directly contributing to oppression," uh: wrong.

exactly. clearly, they are.

Source: jonsnowflakes

29th August 2014

Photo reblogged from La Negra Barbuda with 2,314 notes

minusthelove:

Nooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

minusthelove:

Nooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

Source: oneshittyblog

29th August 2014

Photo reblogged from #ADPhD with 26 notes

africandiasporaphd:

Queen Quet Marquetta L. Goodwine, Chieftess of the Gullah/Geechee nation, stands outside of one of the three remaining praise houses on St. Helena Island, South Carolina. Built during the slave era, they were small places of worship for the Gullah and still serve an important spiritual role.
A Unique African-American Culture, Hundreds of Years Old, That Could Go Extinct


Growing up in Beaufort, South Carolina, in the 1970s, Pete Marovich often overheard locals speaking “a rapid-fire language that sounded similar to English.” At the time, he had no idea then that it was a dialect that had been passed down from their enslaved African ancestors, or that it was just a small piece of the distinct and rich culture of the Gullah people, who’d maintained a strong connection to their roots as, generation after generation, they remained along the coasts of the Carolinas and Georgia (where they’re known as Geechee).




When Marovich moved to Hilton Head Island in the 1990s, he started meeting Gullah people and learning about their history and culture. Brought to America from “the primarily rice-producing regions of West and Central Africa,” the Gullah/Geechee people worked the plantations of the American southeast, where they “developed a separate creole language and distinct culture patterns that included more of their African cultural traditions than the African-American populations in other parts of the United States.” After emancipation, the Gullah/Geechee remained in the same rural coastal communities where they were once enslaved. For many years after that, their communities thrived without much interference from outsiders. They were free to continue long-held traditions of “making seagrass baskets, fishing with handmade nets, burying their dead by the seashore, and living life simply,” as Marovich wrote in the introduction to his book, Shadows of the Gullah Geechee.
Read more.

africandiasporaphd:

Queen Quet Marquetta L. Goodwine, Chieftess of the Gullah/Geechee nation, stands outside of one of the three remaining praise houses on St. Helena Island, South Carolina. Built during the slave era, they were small places of worship for the Gullah and still serve an important spiritual role.

A Unique African-American Culture, Hundreds of Years Old, That Could Go Extinct

Growing up in Beaufort, South Carolina, in the 1970s, Pete Marovich often overheard locals speaking “a rapid-fire language that sounded similar to English.” At the time, he had no idea then that it was a dialect that had been passed down from their enslaved African ancestors, or that it was just a small piece of the distinct and rich culture of the Gullah people, who’d maintained a strong connection to their roots as, generation after generation, they remained along the coasts of the Carolinas and Georgia (where they’re known as Geechee).

When Marovich moved to Hilton Head Island in the 1990s, he started meeting Gullah people and learning about their history and culture. Brought to America from “the primarily rice-producing regions of West and Central Africa,” the Gullah/Geechee people worked the plantations of the American southeast, where they “developed a separate creole language and distinct culture patterns that included more of their African cultural traditions than the African-American populations in other parts of the United States.” After emancipation, the Gullah/Geechee remained in the same rural coastal communities where they were once enslaved. For many years after that, their communities thrived without much interference from outsiders. They were free to continue long-held traditions of “making seagrass baskets, fishing with handmade nets, burying their dead by the seashore, and living life simply,” as Marovich wrote in the introduction to his book, Shadows of the Gullah Geechee.

Read more.

29th August 2014

Photo reblogged from #ADPhD with 332 notes

africandiasporaphd:

Eddie Grant Jr. tends his mother’s garden as new condominiums rise along her property line. While Grant’s family has managed to hold onto their land, many other Gullah/Geechee residents have been forced to sell their property due to rampant development and escalating taxes.
A Unique African-American Culture, Hundreds of Years Old, That Could Go Extinct

africandiasporaphd:

Eddie Grant Jr. tends his mother’s garden as new condominiums rise along her property line. While Grant’s family has managed to hold onto their land, many other Gullah/Geechee residents have been forced to sell their property due to rampant development and escalating taxes.

A Unique African-American Culture, Hundreds of Years Old, That Could Go Extinct

29th August 2014

Photo reblogged from #ADPhD with 22 notes

africandiasporaphd:

Darryl Stoneworth and his wife Angela carry the sweetgrass they harvested at the Okeetee Hunt Club near Hardeeville, South Carolina. All of the traditional areas to harvest the grass in Mt. Pleasant have been shut off to the Gullah due to the development of shopping centers and private residential communities.
A Unique African-American Culture, Hundreds of Years Old, That Could Go Extinct

africandiasporaphd:

Darryl Stoneworth and his wife Angela carry the sweetgrass they harvested at the Okeetee Hunt Club near Hardeeville, South Carolina. All of the traditional areas to harvest the grass in Mt. Pleasant have been shut off to the Gullah due to the development of shopping centers and private residential communities.

A Unique African-American Culture, Hundreds of Years Old, That Could Go Extinct

29th August 2014

Photo reblogged from #ADPhD with 165 notes

africandiasporaphd:

Jery Bennet Taylor sews sweetgrass baskets on the porch at Gullah Grub, a restaurant on St. Helena Island specializing in traditional Gullah food.
A Unique African-American Culture, Hundreds of Years Old, That Could Go Extinct

africandiasporaphd:

Jery Bennet Taylor sews sweetgrass baskets on the porch at Gullah Grub, a restaurant on St. Helena Island specializing in traditional Gullah food.

A Unique African-American Culture, Hundreds of Years Old, That Could Go Extinct

29th August 2014

Photo reblogged from hi-Imcurrentlyobsessed with 375 notes

fckyeahprettyafricans:


Tumblt geekatfashionweek
Ghanaian

fckyeahprettyafricans:

Tumblt geekatfashionweek

Ghanaian

Source: fckyeahprettyafricans

29th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from hi-Imcurrentlyobsessed with 9,925 notes

Source: extraordinary-elite-n-ebony

29th August 2014

Quote reblogged from ~Virtual Virtuosity~ with 107 notes

Palestinian/African American solidarity recognizes that not only the struggle but also the enemy is common. From the brand of tear gas to the assault tactics of the riot squads, Gaza and Ferguson are closer than many would admit. US law enforcement maintains close ties with its Israeli counterparts, and two of the four police forces deployed to Ferguson were trained in Israel.
— Jerome Roos, ‘What Happens in Ferguson Does Not Stay in Ferguson’, teleSUR (via indizombie)

28th August 2014

Link reblogged from The LatiNegr@s Project with 717 notes

The long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place →

tupsyturvy:

We had something similar in the evening standard today - UK Unis complaining of the ‘influx of students from ebola hit areas and the chance of the spread of the disease’ As if the countries are completely over run with diseased individuals.

One uni was even quoted as saying they’ll have to test all students to contain the infection. Because yes, ALL the countries don’t have tests in place or you think they also want to spread the disease further? KMFT

I swear these journalists  and westerners generally really ain’t shit.

Source: tupsyturvy